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Oxalates FAQs

 

Why are oxalates a problem?

 

Oxalates serve no purpose in the body. However, they can cause serious problems and tend to do so in four ways:

  1. via crystal formation and subsequent interaction with immune cells, cause pronounced inflammation. This  can result in irritation at the brain, dry skin, joint pain, bladder issues, etc. Both the scientific literature and clinical observations show that, while there are very common patterns in high-oxalate individuals, oxalate crystals can be found in almost all tissues.
  2. depletion of vitamins and minerals. In forming crystals, oxalates are also robbing your body of these minerals (the negative charge of oxalic acid makes postively charged ions, like Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and Fe2+, vulnerable). Individuals with oxalate issues often have unexplained anaemia or may struggle to increase mineral levels, regardless of how much they supplement.
  3. ‘crowding out’ of competitive molecules, such as sulphur, bicarbonate and chloride, that share transport channels. This can compromise a huge array of metabolic reactions.
  4. depleting glutathione. Oxalates cause huge oxidative stress, which depletes our antioxidant compounds like glutathione. Given how important glutathione is for regulating methylation, immune function, liver detoxification and controlling inflammation in the central nervous system, this can have devastating effects on your well-being.

 

What symptoms do oxalates cause?

 

Here’s the interesting part. There are no symptoms specific to oxalates. The symptoms will always depend on where the oxalate crystals are deposited. One of the many mysteries of oxalates is why some individuals store high concentrations of crystals beneath the skin (and therefore suffer from ‘mystery’ eczema) and others may store them in the joints (and therefore suffer from ‘mystery’ pain in the knees, hips, etc). Other may store them in the central nervous system, which is where they can cause all sort of symptoms (poor balance if they should cluster around the cerebellum, anxiety should they gather at the amygdala, and poor memory should they be located on the hippocampus).

 

In any cases, we will see signs of physical inflammation and neural agitation, which guarantees that energy will never optimal and sleep will never be as refreshing as it should be.

 

As you might imagine, all of these symptoms are attributable to other causes. And this is indeed how many end up being treated (doctors tend to prescribe ever-increasing amounts of steroids to control the inflammation or use psychotropic drugs to compensate for anxiety, while complementary therapists reach for an arsenal of fish oils, anti-microbials and ever-more-violent detox procedures).

 

Why do some people have problems with dietary oxalates and not others?

 

Healthy volunteers have been measured to absorb between 0.75 and 1.9% of oxalates they consume. Susan Owens, a prominent oxalate research, reports that this increases to 50% in some individuals. This all comes down to digestive function. Under ideal circumstances, the body is well-protected from oxalates through three mechanisms:

  1. oxalate degrading bacteria, such as oxalobacter formigenes. This is a bacterial species that is easily wiped out by antibiotics.
  2. mineral chelation. Around 80% of the calcium you consume will not be absorbed from the gut. It is deliberated left in the intestines, where it can bind free oxalic acid, and it does so easily (forming a calcium oxalate crystal). Calcium oxalate is not very soluble, thus cannot cross the intestinal barrier easily and therefore leaves the body in the stool. Problems occur when fat absorption is compromised. as this sees the undigested fats form complexes with the minerals; this reduces the amount of minerals left to chelate the oxalic acids.
  3. increased intestinal permeability. If the oxalic acid has not been degraded by bacteria or chelated by minerals, it can have a run at the intestinal lining. If the digestive lining is in a good state, minimal absorption of oxalates will occur. If it is inflamed and more permeable (‘leaky gut’), oxalates will cross the intestinal barrier easily via the paracellular route (between the junctions), leading to a massive build-up inside the body. Some individuals (with a SLC26A6 polymorphism) may be more suspectible to oxalate absorption via the transcellular route (though intestinal cells), although this needs further research.

 

The higher the accumulation of oxalates, the more likely that the individual has no oxalate-degrading bacteria, do es not digest fats properly and has inflamed/leaky gut lining. This is why dietary oxalates cause havoc in them and not others.

Are there other sources of oxalates?

Unfortunately so. Non-dietary oxalates can come from four sources:

  1. Intestinal infections. This can result in a huge amount of oxalate formation (as species such as candida and aspergillus have been shown to be prolific producers of oxalic acid). Candida also produces arabinose, which may impact on endogenous formation through anti-B6 effects, and all yeast produce erythroascorbic acid (discussed below). In my experience, intestinal infections and oxalate issues tend to go hand-in-hand.
  2. Endogenous production. A combination of genetic susceptibility and a lack of enzyme co-factors (eg. Vitamin A, B1, B6, Magnesium) can result in the mis-processing of amino acids and sees the liver form oxalates from ‘safe’ amino acids, like hydroxyproline (mainly found in collagen).
  3. Excess Vitamin C. A further way that oxalates accumulation can occur is from excess Vitamin C intake during periods of oxidative stress (once vitamin C, aka ascorbic acid, is oxidized into dihydroascorbic acid, it can then be further hydrolyzed into diketogulonic acid and then into oxalic acid). Microbial production of erthyroascobic acid, from intestinal pathogens, may also contribute to this pathway.

Suddenly, it’s no surprise that 91% of the individuals included in my 2017 Chronic Fatigue Survey showed raised urinary oxalates…

 

How are oxalates dealt with?

 

The first priority is determining why the oxalates are an issue. As mentioned above, these can be absorbed in the gut from dietary sources, produced by intestinal pathogens, formed from Vitamin C or manufactured within the body should metabolic pathways become deranged.

In most cases, we will avoid oxalates in the diet, while also adding Vitamin B6 to block conversion of dietary amino acids into oxalates (and compensate for the anti-B6 effects of arabinose). We will also consider steps required to repair the metabolic pathways involved in oxalate production. Vitamin A, Magnesium Biotin, Vitamin B1, Vitamin K and assessing redox balance feature heavily in this work. Obviously, considering the role of intestinal infections is very relevant, although practitioners may want to consider the likelihood of tolerance to this aggressive approach in the early stages of treatment.

 

Will I always have an issue with oxalates?

 

No. Only as long as your digestive tract is vulnerable, you are subject to chronic intestinal infections or your metabolic pathways are deranged. All are fixable, although it normally takes several months.

 

How long does Oxalate dumping last for?

 

When we stop the input of oxalates into the system, we expect the body to respond by ejecting these oxalates from the cells. This sees both oxalate crystals and free oxalic acid released into the system. The irritation that it causes is known as ‘oxalate dumping’, something that is acknowledged in the literature but largely unexplored. However, this can be explained by the movement of oxalates out of the cell, during which we can expect increased interaction with structures called inflammasomes (which, as the name suggests, initiate inflammation). My observations tie in exactly with those of other researchers; I see each dump lasting for 3-6 days, although there are many occasions where multiple dumps occur back-to-back, which can see ongoing dumping symptoms occur daily for a fortnight.

While there are the occasionally ‘quick responders’ that record huge improvements in short periods of time, it is always likely to be an up-and-down journey with both sustained spells of inflammation and glimpses of improved wellbeing. This tends to get slightly easier each week before it settles. We normally see things settle at some point between 8-20 weeks. Although oxalates will continue to be released after things settle, I would not expect them to disturb your wellbeing to the point that it will affect your day-to-day wellbeing or affect other therapeutic avenues we wish to explore.

If dumping symptoms are still highly evident at this point, I would be keen to look at ongoing accumulation from intestinal production (or endogenous production in the liver).

 

What can be done to ameliorate oxalate dumping?

 

During phases of oxalate dumping, symptoms tend to flare both at the cellular level (where the crystals are being released from) and also systemically (where both oxalates and free oxalic acid can now cause irritation).

 

There are two basic approaches (and one bonus approach) used to lessen the symptoms during these dumping phases:

  1. eat oxalate-rich food. This puts the body back into ‘storage mode’, stopping any further release of more oxalate crystals. This obviously means that we are storing up the problem for a later day, although sometimes this is necessary to reduce painful crystal formation.
  2. consume lots of ‘oxalate competitors’ such as sulphur, bicarbonate, chloride and Biotin. Due to a similar molecular shape, these agents occupy the pathways that oxalic acid would normally use to enter cells, crowding out the oxalate and stopping it from having such an impact at cellular level. The easiest ways to get the first three is through baths (Epsom salts, Bicarbonate of Soda and Magnesium Chloride, respectively) and Biotin is available in supplement form.
  3. Take Arginine, which is recommended to help deal with pain. I have seen largely disappointing responses to this, but I include it for consideration.

 

(additionally, should the stool turn grey or yellow during the oxalate dumping process, we should consider the use of Taurine).

 

How effective are these steps? Most individuals report feeling some relief, although generally this is a case of reducing the intensity of symptoms than eliminating them. The reality is that I don’t see them make that much of a difference, at best ‘taking the edge off’. For this reason, I try to avoid the first option as the small amount of relief rarely justifies extending the timescale required.

 

Where can I find more information on Oxalates?

 

There is a Trying Low Oxalates group on Facebook, which is maintained by Susan Owens. She is a biomedical researcher who has spent years studying the effects of oxalates in the body. For an accurate, up-to-date oxalate calculator that measures both soluble and insoluble oxalates, try my Sensible Oxalate Calculator here.

Leave a comment

  1. I think Oxalates are my main problem. Most doctors I have consulted with don’t know much about this issue. How can I find help on this issue?

    1. Speak to a nutrional therapist who is familiar with oxalate issues 😉

      1. How does one replenish oxalate degrading bacteria in the gut after multiple courses of antibiotics?

        1. Herein lies the problem. The primary oxalate-degrading bacteria are Oxalobacter Formigenes. There have been several companies that have attempted to deliver this in probiotic format but the whispers have always told us that it is ‘almost ready and likely to be online sometime next year’. This has been the case for many years now… However, there are certain types of lactobacillus and enterococcus that can also degrade oxalates (see Figure 1 on this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235702/) and thus individuals can expect some help from the use of products that contain these strains.

    2. Hey. I started dealing with inflammation in my body — and started to feel better. Then I suddenly had many oxalate symptoms of toxicity in my gums, teeth, genitals, urine, eyes, skin, etc. Can oxalate toxicity cause them all at once out of nowhere or is that a dumping? I have this doubt because I was dealing with the root cause of my inflammation and then suddenly got worse

      1. Naturally, whenever oxalate-linked symptoms occur, the first question is whether this is oxalates. And certainly any systemic response of this type is something oxalates can cause, so the first step would be to check urinary oxalates (either as a stand-alone test, or as part of an Organic Acids test) and the second step would be to consider what other causes of inflammation may be in play; it sounds like you have undertaken some major changes but obviously I don’t want to speculate on their role in this without knowing what these changes are.

  2. Bloody brilliant article. Thank you so so much!

  3. Thanks Marek, this is a great article to clear up the confusion when searching the internet. Do you offer a guideline as to ‘recommended’ daily oxalate intake ? i.e. is it sufficient to cut out the foods with very high levels (spinach, nuts, cocao etc) reducing intake significantly to say around a PAO score of 100mg or should one try and reduce further ? This will clearly depend on circumstances, personally I have an autoimmune disease and so my gut health/permeability is not optimal.

    1. As a starting point, I’d suggest aiming for a PAO score of 40mg or less…

  4. Is there a way to “test” for oxalates in the body? I have burning feet and my nutritionist is telling me that it is due to a build up of oxalates. Thanks.

    1. Yes, urinary oxalates (from TDL or Medichecks) or as part of an Organic Acids test (Great Plains version). Be aware that dumping occurs in a phasic manner, so around a third of people with oxalates will not show raised levels if you were to do a single test.

  5. Which one do you think is the most dangerous: Oxalates or Lectins? I can attest to the fact that lectins are very problematic. I feel better without them.

    1. It depends on the person. There is only an issue with these food chemicals if they are not handled well. Providing digestive processes are working the way they should, neither would be dangerous. Of course, there are plenty of people for whom digestion is problematic; in these groups, we may see the development of a) oxalate issues, b) lectin issues or c) both.

  6. How far apart are the dumping phases, on average? (Naturally, everyone is different.) Thank you, Marek!

    1. As you noted, it can be difficult to predict. However, in my experience, six months is a reasonable time (to reach a point where oxalates are no longer having an undue impact on your wellbeing)… this is less for some and a lot longer for others, depending on the amount of accumulation.

  7. I started eating a lower oxalate diet and feel much better, less joint pain,
    less leg & foot cramps, less urgency of urinating with nothing coming out, but I’ve noticed I’m losing quite a bit of hair, which is kind of disturbing. After showering I have a handful of hair that’s fallen out that never happened before. I’ve had a couple dumping episodes that were pretty horrible but made me convinced that I finally found the source of so many health issues I’ve had as long as I can remember. So I’m still very encouraged about limiting oxalate but also concerned about losing so much hair. Any thoughts on hair loss?

    1. The two most common imbalances I have found when hair loss occurs have been iron status and thyroid issues. It is relevant that oxalate issues can affect both (however, there are a number of other factors that may impact on these also)… I suggest you ask your doctor to run a proper test for both (for the iron panel, this means serum iron, transferrin and ferritin… for the thyroid panel, this means TSH, T4 and T3 as a minimum, but better to add Antibodies and Reverse T3 also).

      1. Thank you so much for this amazingly informative article! I know a fair amount about oxalates and I’m in the process of detoxing, but your article provided even more valuable information. Can’t thank you enough!

      2. I have had oxalate issues before, and I thought it was all behind me, so I started a keto diet. Now I have joint pain again and my hair is falling out. Is it a problem to do keto with oxalate issues? Does one beg the other?

        1. It’s impossible to say if this is due to oxalates. A number of people starting the ketogenic diet produce insufficient ketones, which can result in low thyroid activity (a common factor behind hair loss) and increased activation of the sympathetic nervous system (which, via endotoxemia, can be a powerful driver of inflammation). Equally, we should not discount Herxheimer responses from carb-consuming microbes in the gut. However, poor fat absorption can result in these fatty acids binding with intestinal calcium, which would normally have a protective effect against oxalate absorption (as the calcium makes them less soluble and, as a result, less able to cross the intestinal barrier). So the link is possible, but so are the other patterns.

    2. Hi Karen,
      Thank you for posting that. I’m having the same thing – an alarming amount of hair loss (a very visibly noticeable scalp when I used to have abundant hair, and finding hair everywhere: on my shirt, on my keyboard, on the dining room table, on the counter, on the couch cushions). Did your hair loss ever stop, or is it on-going? This is so disturbing! I too have been recently undergoing heavy oxalate dumping (probably very excessive – hadn’t realized it could be dangerous), and am just now getting it under control.

      I’m going to try taking B7 & B3 and hope to heavens this starts to reverse (or at least stop) – as recommended by this Youtuber for hair health in general:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXaq4lTDsUU

      There does seem to be some logic to it per this article:
      “Vitamin B for Hair
      One of the most common reasons people turn to biotin supplements is the promise of healthier hair, nails and skin. Many “beauty” supplements contain biotin in high concentrations with marketing claims that it can help reverse hair loss or make your hair grow longer and healthier. However, a report published in the International Journal of Trichology in June 2016 notes that biotin is only effective in promoting hair growth in those with hair loss due to a biotin deficiency.

      The report did dig a little deeper, though, and found that about 38 percent of women who complained of thinning hair had a true biotin deficiency. Because of that, it would make sense that supplementing with biotin may be able to help a little more than one-third of people with hair loss.” https://www.livestrong.com/article/501311-the-effects-of-taking-b-complex-biotin-together/

      Biotin is mentioned in the post above as a ‘competitor’ for oxalates, so perhaps there is a valid connection to hair loss. Fingers crossed…

    3. I’m having the same thing – an alarming amount of hair loss (a very visibly noticeable scalp when I used to have abundant hair, and finding hair everywhere: on my shirt, on my keyboard, on the dining room table, on the counter, on the couch cushions).

      Did your hair loss ever stop, or is it on-going? This is so disturbing! I too have been recently undergoing heavy oxalate dumping (probably very excessive – hadn’t realized it could be dangerous), and am just now getting it under control.

      I’m going to try taking B7 & B3 and hope to heavens this starts to reverse (or at least stop) – as recommended by this Youtuber for hair health in general:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXaq4lTDsUU

      There does seem to be some logic to it per this article:
      “Vitamin B for Hair
      One of the most common reasons people turn to biotin supplements is the promise of healthier hair, nails and skin. Many “beauty” supplements contain biotin in high concentrations with marketing claims that it can help reverse hair loss or make your hair grow longer and healthier. However, a report published in the International Journal of Trichology in June 2016 notes that biotin is only effective in promoting hair growth in those with hair loss due to a biotin deficiency.

      The report did dig a little deeper, though, and found that about 38 percent of women who complained of thinning hair had a true biotin deficiency. Because of that, it would make sense that supplementing with biotin may be able to help a little more than one-third of people with hair loss.” https://www.livestrong.com/article/501311-the-effects-of-taking-b-complex-biotin-together/

      Biotin is mentioned in the post above as a ‘competitor’ for oxalates, so perhaps there is a valid connection to hair loss. Fingers crossed…

  8. Excellent article Marek,

    One question though. I always knew that b6 is very important to prevent glycine into becoming oxalates.

    And of course Dr. Shaw showed correlation between arabinose and oxalates.

    But nowhere have I read that vitamin b6 blocks arabinose from becoming oxalates. Do you have any research?

  9. Hello Marek and thank you so much for this brilliant article! Can the dumping process cause frequent and loose bowel movements?

  10. Thank you so much for the information. The calculator is fantastic ! Greetings from Belgium !

  11. So my doctor did a blood test that showed my blood contained 10x the amount of oxalates considered normal. I feel like mine is due from candida from being on antibiotics in my teens for a long period of time for acne. Everytime I start taking a B complex I feel like crap… bad anxiety, hurting all over, can’t sleep… I wonder if this because my body is dumping oxalates from the B6? I really need some help on this.

    1. It’s obviously impossible to make any conclusions from this but I can certainly share that it is common that individuals would experience these symptoms from oxalates. It’s also common that the addition of B6 would induce flare-ups… So I’d suggest taking the next steps, to both determine if it is indeed the B6 (perhaps looking at the Desert Harvest ‘B Complex without B6’) and to measure the oxalates (perhaps using the Organic Acids test from Great Plains, which includes oxalate markers) and then start building a picture of what factors may contribute to oxalates/what impacts oxalates may be having on various areas of the metabolism. Hope that helps.

    2. As a thought, if the B Complex includes “Pyroxidine HCL” for B6 instead of P5P, you are probably temporarily becoming B6 deficient (which can cause Glyxolate to convert to Oxalate internally, and many other maladies).

      This can be for an extended period of time if your body is slow at converting and/or is missing the nutrients required (zinc, phosphatase, etc.).

  12. Great article!

    Just wondering if there are any health risks with dumping oxalate too fast and in high amounts?

    1. Yes, and there are concerns over the amount of inflammation that can occur in these instances. It happens less often than feared but it still happens. This is where going slow and getting professional help would be highly recommended.

  13. Your site is extremely helpful, thanks! Does taking iron supplements accelerate or increase the dumping?

    1. I have never seen any connection between the rate of dumping and iron supplements (although I would be very weary of iron supplements except in very specific circumstances).

      1. Correct, Iron supplements are not very bio available. Best place to get iron is from eating red meat. Have a steak once a day. Massive amounts of nutrients.

  14. Is it recommended to go low oxalate if your hace dysregulated Metabolism? How does Oxalate dumping affect the adrenals?

    1. There are a number of things that could contribute to metabolic problems and oxalates are one of them. So while it’s not a case that ‘if you have metabolic problems, you need for a low oxalate diet’, this is something that shows up a lot and is definitely worth investigating. The most relevant relationship between oxalates and the adrenals would be via inflammation. Oxalates are a reliable inducer of inflammation, and inflammatory cytokines released in this process can increase activation of the HPA axis as well as alter/increase the response of the adrenal cortex to the stimulation they receive.

  15. This is a very useful resource. I’m curious with the “unexplained anemia”. I’ve been chasing this for the past ten years since discovered thinking it was various factors.

    Oxalates consuming nutrients like Fe (Iron)…that sounds plausible.

    I’ve only recently started lowering my oxalates after finding TLO, but the gut connection (raising 1% to 50% absorption) causing a cascade issue makes sense. I just wonder how much oxalate I’ve accumulated over the years!

    In the mean time, supplementing P5P *modestly* + Iron supplementation would help eliminate my anemia while dumping…or do I need other ingredients?

    1. Whenever I see unexplained anaemia, the first thing I’d do is to run an iron panel (serum iron, transferrin and ferritin) as well as copper/ceruloplasmin. Just over half the people I see with anaemia and low iron availability actually have lots of iron in storage (serum iron and tranferrin represent the iron in circulation, ferritin tells us how much in in storage). So the relationship here can tell us if it’s a case that you simply don’t have enough iron or if it is trapped in storage… if its low, then supplementing (and resolving causes of low absorption/increased loss) would be the way forward. If its trapped in storage, then copper status and systemic inflammation are the first things to consider. Hope that helps.

  16. I’ve recently undertaken a carnivore diet as a potential way of healing a lifetime of health issues. Cutting out oxalate goes hand in hand with this extreme diet. Since the change, I’ve experienced diarrhea with painful stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting and generally feeling very ill. Are these symptoms of oxalate dumping? Thanks.

    1. Going from a ‘normal’ Western diet to a Carnivore diet will normally mean a number of changes… carbohydrates are eliminated, so too oxalates, lectins, salicylates, phenols. Change carbohydrate intake and you change insulin output, which has a big impact on energy signalling (and therefore brain function), electrolytes, blood pressure and lots of other areas. But there is also the issue of withdrawing carbohydrate/fibre intake into the gut, which is a fuel source for many microbes, and potential ‘die-off’. Of course, what happens when you remove the oxalates, or other chemicals? This very much depends on if you have an issue with them. If oxalates are an an issue and they are impacting on gall bladder action, then I can see them causing these problems. But there are other candidates to consider too.

    2. Your body needs vegetables. Hundreds of the body functions require minerals and micronutrients the body cannot produce, that only come from the earth/soil. The minerals are what we get from eating either dirt or the vegetables grown in the dirt.

      1. that is completely 100% false. You can get all your vitamins and minerals eating a carnivore nose to tail diet without all the toxins from plant molecules. The reverse cannot be said. Plants are missing at least 7 key micro nutrients that humans need. Notably b12.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsPSJ-dXqks

  17. Hi Mark,
    Thanks for putting this article out there. It’s giving us a lot of clarity on this issue. I have a couple of questions.
    1. In the section How to Deal with Oxalate you didn’t mention taking Calcium. Is it not good for the protocol?
    2. For the bath, should we take baths that has Epsom salts, Bicarbonate of Soda and Magnesium Chloride all together or individually and alternate that everyday?

    Thank you
    Natalie

    1. So taking Calcium Citrate before meals is entirely legitimate (as a means to create more calcium oxalate salts in the gut, being that these are insoluble and therefore less absorbable). However, depending on the conditions in the gut, this may not be particularly effective so the benefits of this should be weighed up on an individual basis (it is not the universal shield against problems that is sometimes claimed). And as for the bath, using any one of these salts should have a positive impact, although my preference is using them all together.

  18. Hello!
    My 4 yo is dealing with high oxalates. Currently on low ox diet but trying to figure out why?
    Anyway once she is better can she go back to a regular diet?
    Her current symptoms are sand like sediment in urine, deep itching in back and chest/stomach, severe stomach pains, and joint pain in toes/ankles/wrist and sometimes muscle pain in forearm. Do I know she is all better just by clear urine and no symptoms or just less symptoms overall or is there another way as I keep reading that this could take a long time. Or could it also not take too long?

    1. The vast majority of individuals will be able to return to a regular diet when the oxalates issues have been resolved. There are some individuals who do not have oxalobacter formigenes in their gut, which is the primary bacteria that processes oxalates, which means they may need to focus on other lactobacillus species that can help out with this process (use of probiotics and stool testing to determine effects within the microbiome)… While a disappearance of all symptoms is naturally the most encouraging thing we can see, it would be ideal to run a series of urinary tests to get confirmation. Meanwhile, I’d suggest an Organic Acids test and a stool test (eg. GI Effects, GI Map, etc) to determine if this is purely a dietary thing, due to fungal production or due to endogenous formation in the liver.

  19. Hi!

    Thank you so much for this. Very informative.

    I am curious if you could spare your advice. Sorry for long-winded info. I left out as much as I could to shorten…

    Celiac, dysbiosis, high igg4, histamine Intolerance, +++. Pinpointed to oxalates as I’ve eaten “healthy” while trying to heal for 13 years.

    Now my lymph nodes have been infected and had to use penicillin. Been 3 months since then, but now they are swelling and painful… I’m getting a lot of dumping as i continue to reduce oxalates in food. I’ve got massive dysbiosis so that’s a driving factor. Using antimicrobials, probiotics x3 (lacto/bifido/saccharomyces/another soil which degrades oxalates), elemental diet, today added calcium citrate before meals (gradually increasing), berberine cycles, dead sea salt foot baths under dumping (removes dumping syntpoms within 10-20 minutes ..) ++.

    Is there anything more I should do to support my body? Cold showers, meditate, yin. My detoxification is definitely overburdered.

    Wish you a great day and thanks in advance!
    Sincerely, James

    1. I’m obviously not in a position to provide any specific advice but it’s worth sharing that a) I have worked with thousands of people who have had long-term burdens and are struggling to see improvements and 100% of them have only been able to progress once they tended to the central nervous system, eg. determine what type of stress response they are subject to (ie. sympathetic stress, aka ‘fight-and-flight’, or parasympathetic stress, aka ‘freeze’). There’s some focus on the differences in this article: https://www.marekdoyle.com/heart-variability-and-stress-explained-how-to-measure-it-healthy-ranges-how-to-increase-it/. And b) everyone who takes an Organic Acids Test comes away with some action points (be that a step in a mitochondrial pathway that is slowed to due nutritional shortage, neurotransmitter patterns that need attention, antioxidant response, etc etc) so that may be worthwhile considering.

  20. i have had a type of burning sensation in my right foot and the pain goes up into my hip if i walk a while..had this for about a year and just realised it coincided with me having rhubarb in my porridge,love of dark chocolate and eating nuts like cashews on a regular basis and a big tea drinker so ive decided to eliminate all these and see what happens..

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